By Kit Bowen
TheMovieKit.com

I don’t want to toot my horn or anything, but I didn’t do half bad in predicting the 67th Annual Golden Globe movie winners, missing only three out of the 14 categories (don’t pay attention to my TV picks, though). That’s why they pay me the big bucks (wink, wink, nudge, nudge).

As I suspected, the juggernaut that is “Avatar” took the best drama Globe, as did James Cameron for best director, which now puts them both squarely in front. At least Cameron didn’t go all “king of the world” on us again when he won for best director. Instead, he gave his ex-wife Kathryn Bigelow — nominated for her own amazing work with “The Hurt Locker” – a nice compliment when he said in his acceptance speech, “Frankly, I thought Kathryn was going to get this. She richly deserves it.” Still, you got to know that guy’s head is about as big as his make-believe “Avatar” planet Pandora, but as arrogant and pretentious as Cameron can be, his talent is undeniable.

In the best comedy or musical, I was slightly off by picking “(500) Days of Summer” to win, but I applauded mightily when “The Hangover” won the prize. I just thought it would be too raunchy for the Hollywood Foreign Press – and I stand corrected. In fact, my respect for the HFPA went way up for honoring it because, hands down, “The Hangover” truly was the funniest movie of 2009. Did anyone notice they were playing that little ditty Ed Helm’s character sang in the movie as the cast and crew went up to collect the award? “… Don’t you worry your pretty striped head, we’re gonna get you back to Tyson and your cozy tiger bed …” Cracked me up.

In the acting categories, I rightly predicted Christophe Waltz’s turn in “Inglourious Basterds” and Mo’Nique’s part in “Precious” would win in the best supporting slots. I’ll go even further: They are the shoo-ins to win the Oscar, as well. No question in my mind. I also picked Meryl Streep to win best actress in a comedy or musical for “Julie & Julia,” but that was a no-brainer. I simply adore her. Her speech was both hilarious and poignant – just like the actress herself. Seriously, unless we find out she’s been a secret serial killer all these years, this woman can do NO wrong.

And speaking of great acceptance speeches, my man Robert Downey Jr. gave a hysterical one after winning for best actor in a comedy or musical for his role as Sherlock Holmes, which I correctly guessed. He thanked his frequent producing collaborator Joel Silver, the “guy that’s only restarted my career 12 times since I began 25 years ago.” Love him, too (but for different reasons than Streep).

Jeff Bridges got a standing O for his win as best actor in a drama for his turn in “Crazy Heart,” which actually brought a tear to my eye. I mean, the guy has been around for such a long time, always giving top-notch performances. In fact, I was flipping through the channels the other day and ending up watching “The Last Picture Show,” Bridges’ first Academy Award nomination. I’m pleased he is getting his due, as I thought he would.

The one acting award I missed on was with best actress in a drama. I thought the HFPA would go for the Brit Carey Mulligan from “An Education.” Although, to be fair, I did say Sandra Bullock would win if they were going for the popular vote, which is exactly what the HFPA did. In any case, Sandy deserves it because she, too, gave a classy performance in “The Blind Side” – and she was wearing an awesome dress.

As for the show itself, I think Ricky Gervais was pretty friggin’ hilarious as the host. Self-depreciating, shamelessly plugging his stuff, quietly drinking beer on stage, putting down the other celebrities in only the way a reserved British comedian can. The wisecracking quip, as he drank his beer: “I like a drink as much as the next man, unless the next man is Mel Gibson,” as he introduced Globe presenter Mel Gibson, who made the headlines a few years ago when he got a DUI and went on an anti-Semitic rant. Or talking about having a penis reduction to just one, a small one, which looks big in his small hand, which is where it is most of the time. Brilliant, just brilliant. Of course, NBC and its whole late-night screw up was not at all spared from the biting comments from just about everyone. Good, they should get slammed. Idiots.

Oh, and the third one I missed? Best score: I thought James Horner’s score for “Avatar” would win, but I also said Michael Giacchino’s score for “Up” could sneak in there – and that’s what happened. Oh well.

Here are the 67th Annual Golden Globe winners:

MOVIES

Best Picture – Drama: “Avatar”
Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: “The Hangover”
Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama: Jeff Bridges, “Crazy Heart”
Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama: Sandra Bullock, “The Blind Side”
Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: Robert Downey Jr., “Sherlock Holmes”
Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy: Meryl Streep, “Julie and Julia”
Best Supporting Actor: Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds”
Best Supporting Actress: Mo’Nique, “Precious”
Best Director: James Cameron, “Avatar”
Best Screenplay: “Up in the Air”
Best Animated Feature: “Up”
Best Foreign Language Film: “The White Ribbon, “ Germany
Best Original Song: “The Weary Kind,” performed by Ryan Bingham, “Crazy Heart”
Best Original Score: Michael Giacchino, “Up’

TELEVISION

Best TV Series – Drama: “Mad Men”
Best Performance by an Actor in a TV Series – Drama: Michael C. Hall, “Dexter”
Best Performance by an Actress in a TV – Drama: Julianna Marguilies, “The Good Wife”
Best TV Series – Comedy: “Glee”
Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series – Comedy: Toni Collette, “The United States of Tara”
Best Performance by an Actor in a TV Series – Comedy: Alec Baldwin, “30 Rock”
Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV: John Lithgow, “Dexter”
Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV: Chloe Sevigny, “Big Love”
Best Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV: “Grey Gardens”
Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for TV: Drew Barrymore,”Grey Gardens”
Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for TV: Kevin Bacon, “Taking Chance”