After a grossly underwhelming third installment in the Underworld series, it is both remarkable and impressive that its fourth entry would beat out the latest George Lucas film. But then, no one, not even myself (as implied by my faulty trust in the film’s success last week), was prepared for how mind-bogglingly dull Red Tails would be on the ground, considering the incredible premise it began from.

It is not so much credit to Underworld as discredit to Lucas that his war-epic lost to the latest film in a sputtering Goth-series. I suppose it’s official: Lucas can no longer write. It appears his place is in a world of cinema which existed three decades ago, and the transition into the modern silver screen never happened. No one who writes in that much Jar-Jar Binks should attempt a war film, which means a hell of a lot to a great number of viewers.

 

It is interesting to note that Underworld: Awakenings happens to be the highest rated on IMDb over the preceding chapters. I don’t know what it is about rekindled series, but I believe Live Free or Die Hard somewhat began it, and last year’s X-Men: First Class culminating in Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol has to tell us never to completely count a series out.

 

As redundant as Underworld has become, particularly with making a sequel after a prequel that was made because the studios were too impatient for Kate Beckinsale to realize that Whiteout was never going to be a good movie, it was a massive completely unforeseeable upset this weekend that was well-earned by the many screenwriters.

 

I wouldn’t put it past Liam to take the Box Office from the vampires and lycans next weekend, because his foray into action was startlingly impressive back with Taken, regardless of Unknown and I believe his capacity to inflate dignity into pretty much any role he takes is more than respectable. The man was Schindler! Also Michael Collins. And Rob Roy. We like Neeson, no matter what sparkly suits he wears from the Titans films. Hell, if sparkly vampires don’t ruin careers these days, nothing sparkly can.

But then there’s his competition, Clash co-star Sam Worthington, ironically enough, who stars in Man on a Ledge next weekend, the narrative debut from documentary filmmaker Asger Leth may very well out-play The Grey. With a much more compelling plot than your average survival story, it all comes down to whether or not Sam Worthington’s name really has as much pull anymore. He started so strongly that by contrast, his latest projects simply don’t add up to duo beginning Terminator: Salvation and Avatar.

 

Lastly, Katherine Heigl just doesn’t fit these days. What happened to end her career so abruptly I’m not sure, but it’s certainly true that she doesn’t much matter now. One For the Money will likely scrounge up a few dollars from women desperate to see an actual rom-com since there aren’t many recently, and then spiral from the box office fairly quickly. Who cares.

 

Also, Haywire is so cheesy and stupid, I don’t even want to talk about it. At least this way, you don’t have to read about it. What was Michael Fassbender thinking?? Who on Earth wants to co-star non-actor Channing Tatum anyway? However! Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol has officially had one month of screen time, and still holds on to the top ten at eight in the box office, so a congratulations is in order, there.

 

TW

LW

Title

Weekend Gross

Total Gross

Week

1

N

Underworld Awakening

$25,400,000

$25,400,000

1

2

N

Red Tails

$19,100,000

$19,100,000

1

3

1

Contraband

$12,200,000

$46,100,000

2

4

36

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

$10,545,000

$11,237,000

5

5

N

Haywire

$9,000,000

$9,000,000

1

6

2

Beauty and the Beast (3D)

$8,556,000

$33,364,000

2

7

4

Joyful Noise

$6,075,000

$21,903,000

2

8

3

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol

$5,540,000

$197,349,000

6

9

5

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

$4,805,000

$178,611,000

6

10

7

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)

$3,750,000

$94,775,000

5