With the anticipated release of Snow White and the Huntsman fairy tales are all the rage right now in pop culture. This year has seen dueling Snow White movies, the other was Tarsem Singh’s more family friendly Mirror Mirror. Television has seen a few fairy tale themed shows. ABC’s Once Upon a Time and NBC’s Grimm have just finished their well-received first seasons. There are a number of similar projects making their way to theaters. Next year Bryan Singer’s remake of Jack The Giant Killer staring Nicolas Hoult will be released in March. Angelina Jolie is set to star in Disney’s Maleficent, which will tell the story of “Sleeping Beauty” from its notorious villainous. This trend is hardly anything new. Here’s a look at some past entries of reimaged folklore on screen.
 

Snow White: A Tale of Terror (1997)
Long before Charlize Theron feed K-Stew the poison apple Sigourney Weaver served up some wicked queen realness in this gem of a made for T.V movie. Originally airing on Showtime, Tale of Terror is a cult favorite that goes back to its dark Grimm Brothers roots. Almost playing out as a horror film this isn’t the cuddly family classic of Walt Disney. It’s a fun and creepy take on the story, and Weaver’s brilliantly fleshes out a seemly one-dimensional character.
 

Ever After: A Cinderella Story (1998)
Here’s Tale of Terror’s kitschier counterpart blandly dubbed Ever After: A Cinderella Story. It’s a favorite if you grew up in the 90s. It also served as Drew Barrymore’s career post bad girl revamp. This take on Cinderella sets it in the backdrop of the Italian Renaissance. Upon reexamining the film holds up merely on nostalgia.  Barrymore dons a hammy accent that might be more at home as a waitress at Medieval Times, and Angelica Houston does some great scene chewing as the evil stepmother.
 

Freeway (1996)
Think Little Red Riding Hood by the way of Natural Born Killers.  Reese Witherspoon stars as a teenage juvenile delinquent hitchhiking to her grandma’s trailer park only to be picked up by a serial killer/pedophile “bad wolf” played by Kiefer Sutherland.  It’s a bold and twisted approach to its source material. Witherspoon has said in interviews since that this was when she discovered her comedic timing as an actress. Couldn’t agree more since she plays out the black comedy perfectly.
 

A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
Steven Spielberg’s fascinating story of a robot boy named David (Haley Joel Osment) who longs to become “real” has its roots in Carlo Collodi’s “The Adventures of Pinocchio”. Conceived by Stanley Kubrick in its early years of development Spielberg’s film bears lot of similarities with the children’s fable. Midway through the story of “Pinocchio” inspires David to go in search for the Blue Fairy to make him a real boy. It’s an odd and sad film that has some memorable supporting characters, such as Jude Law’s shamefully underrated performance as an android gigolo named Joe, and stuffed robot bear named Teddy (David’s Jimmy Cricket perhaps?).
 

Shrek (2001)
A much-needed alternative to the usual Disney takes on the classics. Shrek cherry picks from a truckload of fairy tale characters creating something utterly unique, and very of the moment of the early 2000’s in its post-modern approach.
 

A Cinderella Story (2004)
The year was 2004. When LiLo’s criminal record was clean, The O.C was the hot topic around the water cooler, and Hilary Duff starred in A Cinderella Story. Duff’s failed star vehicle is another craptastic take on Cinderella this time setting it amiss high school dances, and internet secret admires. Jennifer Coolidge did make a terrific botoxed evil stepmother.
 

The Brothers Grimm (2005)
Does anybody remember this Terry Gilliam turkey staring Matt Damon and the late Heath Ledger? The movie follows the misadventures of Will and Jake Grimm as travelling con artists who foil a witch’s curse on a village. The movie is a mess. It has so much going on in it, it’s hard to know what to look at on screen. Only Gilliam could create such an oddly watchable fiasco.
 

Sydney White (2008)
When the folks over at Criterion compile their Amanda Bynes box set this is sure to be in it. This is another interpretation of “Snow White” this time going the route of Revenge of the Nerds setting it around college sororities.
 

Red Riding Hood (2011)
The makers of SWATH probably learned a thing or two from the result of this movie last year. It might have seemed like a natural fit to mesh the Twilight formula with “Little Red Riding Hood” at the time. The movie’s dark interpretation doesn’t jive as well as its director Catherine Hardwick would like to think it does. This cinematic dropped ball that places Amanda Seyfried at the center of a love triangle with a werewolf on the loose does however provide for amusement for when you run across it on premium cable.
 

Beastly (2011)
This will probably be one of those trashy movies that you have to drop what you’re doing when it airs on cable to watch. When an Olsen Twin casts a spell on private school brat played by Alex Pettyfer he must live as a “hideous” monster in his penthouse Upper East Side loft only to have the spell undone by High School Musical cutie Vanessa Hudgens. It’s interesting that when even under the spell Pettyfer’s handsome jaw line, and ripped abs remains unscathed.