Frozen II continues the adventures of Elsa, Anna, Kristoff, Sven and Olaf. This time around Elsa and Anna discover secrets to their past, as the whole gang evolve from their beginnings.

At the recent press conference, the stars of Frozen II – Idina Menzel, Kristen Bell, Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad and Evan Rachel Wood (who is a newcomer to the Frozen universe as Elsa and Anna’s mom) – along with directors Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck and songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Bobby Lopez talked about making the sequel and more

On why Jennifer Lee wanted to return for a sequel:

Jennifer Lee: We did a small short [Frozen Fever] and when we saw the characters animated again, we got emotional. The questions kept rolling, and we realized we had been talking about those same questions. And, we naively just said, ‘We have more story to tell,’ because we’re not ready to leave this world. We love this world.

On how Elsa and Anna could never fade away from Menzel and Bell:

Idina Menzel: Returning to this family, this beautiful film that’s gifted us with so much joy in our lives—and getting to connect with another human being and sister like Kristen—is something we’re proud of.

Kristen Bell: And I think that it generally never really ended. I’m very similar to Anna, and I’ve tried to infuse a ton of me into this character—maybe more so than I’ve ever really done.

On how Olaf growing up affects Josh Gad – and his family:

Josh Gad: My oldest child was sitting at the table one day, and all of sudden tears started streaming down her face. She looked my wife and me and goes, ‘What if I don’t want to grow up?’” It was so unbelievable, because I think we all have had that experience as kids. That is the way I feel about Olaf in this movie. In the first movie, he was this innocent ball of naiveté who was willing to basically go out into the summer sun because he didn’t know any better, and in this movie he’s almost gone from toddler to fully grown child. Now, he’s starting to ask those questions that don’t always have easy answers, and from a comedic perspective, there was so much to play with.

And on having Elsa and Anna as role models in his house:

Gad: Also, the coolest thing about watching Frozen and now, Frozen II, with my daughters is that they have Idina and Kristen as their role models. I get to share this with two girls who get to look up to two fiercely independent Disney princesses who I think are changing the way we view what a princess is, and I love that.

On Frozen II’s empowerment  for men:

Bell: We talk about female empowerment, it’s led by two women, but I personally think that the representation Jonathan gives for the guys is out-of-this world.

Evan Rachel Wood: Prince Sincere, not Prince Charming

On Kristoff’s ‘80s-style ballad in Frozen II:

Bell: Dare I say, it’s one of the best, or at least one of the top three moments of the film.

Gad: One of the funniest songs in Disney Animation history.

On not trying to top “Let It Go”:

Bobby Lopez: We never think about hits or anything like that. The reason for that is that is because of Jennifer, Chris, and Peter. When they first began this project, they didn’t think about trying to top the first one. They just thought about the characters and the story. They pitched us this bit of an idea that they had, and it gave us the chills.

Menzel: I feel so trusting of the situation and this creative process… There’s something about how Kristen and Bobby can write such memorable and powerful melodies while also telling story that evolves character. [It] is just quite a gift. So, I can just go in there and have fun.

On getting to sing for a Disney film:

Wood: Disney raised me… These films are just living breathing works of art, and there’s so much love and care poured into all of them. I’ve been singing Disney lullabies to my son since he was born, so to be welcomed into the Disney family is already huge, and then to be given a Disney lullaby of my own was… I’m still processing it.

On Frozen’s staying power:

Chris Buck: We’ve been floored by the response. People come up to us to say the movie brought their family together, that it’s changed their lives, and it’s all very, very powerful… everything else is ‘whatever’ because ultimately, it’s all about touching people